Ten Days in a Mad-House

Ten Days in a Mad House Nellie Bly s journal of being institutionalized for days An expose of how the insane were treated

  • Title: Ten Days in a Mad-House
  • Author: Nellie Bly
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 243
  • Format: None
  • Nellie Bly s journal of being institutionalized for 10 days An expose of how the insane were treated.

    • Free Read [Christian Book] Â Ten Days in a Mad-House - by Nellie Bly ✓
      243 Nellie Bly
    • thumbnail Title: Free Read [Christian Book] Â Ten Days in a Mad-House - by Nellie Bly ✓
      Posted by:Nellie Bly
      Published :2019-06-16T10:03:02+00:00


    About “Nellie Bly

    • Nellie Bly

      Librarian Note There is than one author in the GoodReads database with this name See this thread for information Nellie Bly was the pen name of pioneer female journalist Elizabeth Jane Cochran She remains notable for two feats a record breaking trip around the world in emulation of Jules Verne s character Phileas Fogg Bly completed the trip in seventy two days , and an expos in which she faked insanity to study a mental institution from within In addition to her writing, she was also an industrialist and charity worker Bly died of pneumonia at St Mark s Hospital in New York City in 1922 aged 57.enpedia wiki Nellie_Bly



    635 thoughts on “Ten Days in a Mad-House

    • Update The book is freehere. If you read this book without knowing anything of Nellie Bly except that she was a journalist, you might think it was a wonderful expose of the absolute horrors of bedlam in New York. You might doubt whether really the food was so bad that apart from a crust or two and a bowl of cold tea, it was totally inedible - the bread had spiders baked into it. You might wonder if the nurses were all nasty, brutish and extremely violent. Question if the doctors were either havi [...]


    • 3.5 Stars Ten Days in a Mad-House is a book by newspaper reporter Nellie Bly. Nellie took the terrifying task of posing as Nellie Borwn in an undercover assisment to investigate the deplorable conditions of insane asylums. While on the assignment she feigned insanity at a women's boarding house and was involuntarily committed to the Women's Lunatic Alylum on Blackwell's Island. Ten Days in a Mad House is a quick and insightful read into the way the mentally ill were treated or should I say mistr [...]


    • Ten Days in a Mad-house, hat's off to you, Nellie Bly. My new hero.  For the sake of a story, she faked insanity and she got herself admitted into an insane asylum then wrote an exposé on the Blackwell's Island women's asylum in New York. Not knowing how, or if, she or anybody else would be able to get her out. And all this before women even had the right to vote. Blows my mind. Girls got guts.   The story was published in a series of articles for Joseph Pulitzer's New York City Newspape [...]


    • Ten Days in a Mad-House is one amazing book! I love it. The fact that it's a real story makes it even more interesting.Nellie Bly is a journalist who is asked to go undercover as a patient in an asylum and write about it. She does and it's amazing how easily she is declared insane. The examination mainly consists in a brief physical checkup (what's that all about looking at the tongue?) and a few questions focused on whether or not she is a kept woman. She is finally shipped to the Women's Lunat [...]


    • I do not know where to even start with this. The fact that this was non fiction just blew my mind. I've read fiction books that take place in mad houses during the 19th century, but the fiction was more of a reality than I had originally thought.Nellie Bly is a journalist and gets an assignment in 1887 to go undercover and spend ten days in a mad-house and report her findings. She goes about this by purchasing a room in a women's boarding house and acting peculiar. She says that all the other wo [...]


    • This was amazing and horrifying. In 1887 Nellie Bly faked insanity and spent 10 days in an insane asylum so she could report on the conditions. The conditions were horrendous at best. There were beatings, cold baths in the same water as all the other "prisoners', inedible food, extreme cold conditions and the list goes on and on. Due to her bravery and reporting skills she was able to improve conditions and get more money allocated to treatment of the insane then ever had before.


    • This was excellent. A journalist fakes insanity in order to gain admittance to an insane asylum in 1887. She sees some bad shit. She reports it. A number of reforms are introduced as a result of the bad shit she reports. I can't believe I hadn't heard of this until now.I listened to the audiobook which was only a couple hours long and the narration was outstanding. Highly recommended.I was provided this audiobook at no charge by the author, publisher and/or narrator in exchange for an unbiased r [...]


    • First of all, I tried to imagine what kind of courage it took for Nellie Bly to allow herself to be committed to this kind of horrible institution from which there were no avenues of escape. I would have been too frightened of the possibility of being left there indefinitely to accept this assignment! The writing is very straight forward and the experiences are detailed in a way that makes it ring with truth. It seems that the most cruel of people were employed in insane asylums at this time and [...]


    • Nellie Bly was the world's first stunt journalist. She traveled around the world in 72 days to beat Phineas Fogg, she documented the conditions of women factory workers, and she faked insanity to get committed to the notorious Blackwell Island. This is her expose of the conditions there.You too can practice insanity at home!It's a great read: brisk, engaging, convincing. She describes with authority and empathy the freezing, starving, beating, choking and waterboarding of the poor women interred [...]


    • A couple of years ago I did a haunted walking tour in my neighborhood and the person in charge talked about this story. I was immediately intrigued and when I got home, got online and ordered the book. It proceeded to sit on my shelves and was forgotten for quite some time. Then late last year, I read The Address by Fiona Barton and lo and behold, Nellie Bly was mentioned and remembered I had this story to read and finally I did!Nellie Bly went undercover in an insane asylum. with no real knowle [...]


    • Ten Days in A Mad-House, Was Written By Nellie Bly in 1887, after she lived, undercover, at a women's insane asylum at Blackwell's Island in 1887 for ten days. This was an assignment given to her by Joseph Pulitzer.It is so hard to read this account in 2017 130 years after Nellie Bly's report of her 10 days uncover playing the part of an insane woman. At that time there were 1600 women imprisoned some of them for nothing more than not being able to speak English, some were there at the behest o [...]


    • Nellie Bly was a reporter in New York who convinced the courts that she was insane and got herself locked away at Blackwell's Island. Her expose of the conditions there led to increased care and resources given to the patients. What really shocked me about this piece was not the terrible treatment the patients endured, but how easily, and on what tenuous grounds, women were declared insane.


    • This was fascinating. My heart broke a little every time I reminded myself that it, terrifyingly, wasn't a work of fiction.


    • A non-fiction story by Nellie Bly (or as she called herself in the book Nellie Brown ) who was a reporter in the late 1880s that faked insanity in order to get committed to an insanity asylum in Blackwell Island or as currently called Roosevelt Island in New York CityRoosevelt Island is a very small island which was used mainly for hospitals they would send patients and the insane there to isolate them from the rest of the city."And then, once in, what would be my experience? And after? How to g [...]


    • What a brave woman!In 1887 desperate for work journalist Nellie Bly, real name Elizabeth Jane Cochran, agreed to feign madness and spend ten days in Blackwell's Island Insane Asylum, exposing the atrocious conditions that then existed in such institutions.She fooled all the doctors easily merely by acting scared and confused, claiming to be from Cuba and wittering on about some imaginary lost luggage. She swiftly discovered that 'no doctor could tell whether people were insane or not, so long as [...]


    • Interesting short novel, or novella?, written by Nellie Bly as a series of articles for the New York World (newspaper) in 1887. Going undercover at the Women's Lunatic Asylum on Blackwell Island, New York, Nellie uncovered the grotesque, cruel and most likely illegal living conditions the women and girls there had to endure. Also, the fact that many of these women weren't 'insane' but had been locked up or put away by (sometimes) well-meaning parents, spouses or other relatives, or even friends [...]


    • Nellie Bly, a 20 something 19th century reporter gets herself locked in an asylum. As expected the conditions are horrible. The guards are called nurses but they’re really just keepers and cruel ones at that. The food is all but inedible and, like the Woody Allen joke, such small portions. Though the weather has turned cold it’s against asylum policy to turn the heat on, added to that is the practice of leaving the windows open and cold baths. Occasionally they are tied together with rope an [...]


    • "Positively demented," he said. "I consider it a hopeless case. She needs to be put where some one will take care of her.""Are you crazy?" I asked."No," she replied; "but as we have been sent here we will have to be quiet until we find some means of escape.""Miss Grupe proved to be one of those people who are ashamed of their nationality, and she refused, saying she could understand but few worlds of her mother tongue.""A German girl, Louise–I have forgotten her last name–did not eat for sev [...]


    • To be honest, I don't even know where to start Nellie Bly, a young journalist who went undercover as an insane lady,relates the horror in which the Blackwells Island Asylum patients were livingThe non caring physicians and the over cruel nurses made these people go insane if they weren't or even more insane if they already were mentally illThe cold, the heaters that weren't on, the unsufficiant clothers and covers, freezing to death and not be able to sleepThe ice cold baths, until your skin get [...]


    • Unfortunately, not much in this account of mental patients being misdiagnosed, invalidated, ignored, neglected, and abused in the late 1800s surprised me. At the time, however, I'm sure it was shocking for people in the city to learn of the type of treatment these patients received, and Bly's account helped to improve conditions somewhat. It's kind of interesting to read while keeping in mind how much is different now and how much is the same. Conditions in hospitals are obviously better nowaday [...]


    • One of the unsung and relatively unknown heroines of the post Civil War era is Elizabeth Jane Cochrane (1864-1922), a writer, journalist and inventor that went under the pseudonym of Nellie Bly. In 1887, while working as a journalist at the New York World she was asked to do an undercover assignment and feign insanity to be admitted to the Woman’s Lunatic Asylum on Blackwell’s Island. She went with a mission to report the procedure of admittance, conditions and treatment of the patients sent [...]


    • This isn't the kind of book you read to give you warm fuzzy feelings and sweet dreams. It is actually quite disturbing in places, but it was an expose and she didn't know what she'd find when she got "committed" to the insane asylum. And what she found was shocking. Institutions like these where no outsiders are allowed to penetrate seem to breed monsters for wardens/ nurses/ doctors.The GOOD news is that Nellie Bly,by means of her expose ( being a journalist with connections) was able to raise [...]


    • What a brave young woman Nellie was to get committed to an asylum so she could write an exposé about conditions. This audiobook was very melodramatically read, but the language seemed in keeping with the time. It felt like a penny-dreadful, but I'm sure it didn't reveal half of the barbarism women faced in those circumstances.


    • Wow. Conditions were just absolutely MISERABLE for women in America in the late 1880s to early 1900s. Perfectly sane women were shoved in mental asylums, along with women with real mental problems, and then were treated in a way to practically GUARANTEE that they would go mad/stay mad/get worse. Frigid temperatures, inadequate clothing for the cold, disgusting, inedible food, forced to do all of the cleaning, frigid baths once a week, even the sick, using the same water and towels as everyone el [...]


    • What a badass Nellie Bly was. I've been wanting to read this for a long time. I remember learning about Bly in school but was reminded again of her investigative reporting when I saw a 4-D film at the Newseum in Washington, DC that touched on a few groundbreaking events in the history of journalism. It has taken me too long to finally get around to reading her personal account.I can only imagine how shocking this must have been at the time if it's release in 1887. Today, we have seen so many dep [...]


    • Sharing some of my thoughts and feelings about "Ten Days in a Made-House." - stream of consciousness form.I did not enjoy this book. If enjoyment and light entertainment is what you're looking for then this book isn't for you, because what Bly uncovers and reveals, although not surprising to me, is horrific and makes me fume with anger and outrage.Bly boldly describes the way women were thought of and treated by men, and about women's virtually nonexistent legal rights during the 1800s and earli [...]



    • If you are a female journalist, you have heard about Nellie Bly. A pioneer in the field of investigative journalism, Elizabeth Jane Cochran seemed fearless but she was also -- as I learned after reading this short book -- an industrialist, inventor and adventurer. It is not surprising considering what she did in finding out the state of New York's asylums. Reading this it seemed very easy, too easy, to have someone decide that you are insane. And once deemed insane and with no treatments toward [...]


    • This kind of manuscript (never mind that it was originally published in parts) would never fly today. Publishers would want far more detail, copious research, and three or four times as much length. They'd want her, ideally, to draw on extensive interviews with doctors and nurses and patients. They'd want a discussion of other treatment models. They'd want, in short, a very different book.And I am very, very grateful that this is not that very different book. Because this? This is excellent. Nel [...]


    • "A Very Important Instance of Victorian Journalism."Suzie Althens did a wonderful job with the narration. It's a classic piece of journalism - one of the earliest instances of female journalism. What Nellie Bly did to write this piece was incredibly brave and even more important that many realize. She changed so many lives for the better. She didn't change the whole world and it didn't fix everything, but it did help make hopeless lives a little better.Anytime you read a modern journalistic piec [...]


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