Quiet Until the Thaw: A Novel

Quiet Until the Thaw A Novel From bestselling memoirist Alexandra Fuller a debut novel Lakota Oglala Sioux Nation South Dakota Two Native American cousins Rick Overlooking Horse and You Choose Watson though bound by blood and

  • Title: Quiet Until the Thaw: A Novel
  • Author: Alexandra Fuller
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 336
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • From bestselling memoirist Alexandra Fuller, a debut novel Lakota Oglala Sioux Nation, South Dakota Two Native American cousins, Rick Overlooking Horse and You Choose Watson, though bound by blood and by land, find themselves at odds as they grapple with the implications of their shared heritage When escalating anger towards the injustices, historical and current, inflFrom bestselling memoirist Alexandra Fuller, a debut novel Lakota Oglala Sioux Nation, South Dakota Two Native American cousins, Rick Overlooking Horse and You Choose Watson, though bound by blood and by land, find themselves at odds as they grapple with the implications of their shared heritage When escalating anger towards the injustices, historical and current, inflicted upon the Lakota people by the federal government leads to tribal divisions and infighting, the cousins go in separate directions Rick chooses the path of peace You Choose, violence Years pass, and as You Choose serves time in prison, Rick finds himself raising twin baby boys, orphaned at birth, in his meadow As the twins mature from infants to young men, Rick immerses the boys within their ancestry, telling wonderful and terrible tales of how the whole world came to be, and affirming their place in the universe as the result of all who have come before and will come behind But when You Choose returns to the reservation after three decades behind bars, his anger manifests, forever disrupting the lives of Rick and the boys A complex tale that spans generations and geography, Quiet Until the Thaw conjures with the implications of an oppressed history, how we are bound not just to immediate family but to all who have come before and will come after us, and, most of all, to the notion that everything was always, and is always, connected As Fuller writes, The belief that we can be done with our past is a myth The past is nudging at us constantly.

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      Posted by:Alexandra Fuller
      Published :2019-09-16T20:02:33+00:00


    About “Alexandra Fuller

    • Alexandra Fuller

      Alexandra Fuller has written five books of non fiction.Her debut book, Don t Let s Go to the Dogs Tonight An African Childhood Random House, 2001 , was a New York Times Notable Book for 2002, the 2002 Booksense best non fiction book, a finalist for the Guardian s First Book Award and the winner of the 2002 Winifred Holtby Memorial Prize.Her 2004 Scribbling the Cat Travels with an African Soldier Penguin Press won the Ulysses Prize for Art of Reportage.The Legend of Colton H Bryant was published in May, 2008 by Penguin Press and was a Toronto Globe and Mail, Best Non Fiction Book of 2008.Cocktail Hour Under the Tree of Forgetfulness was published in August 2011 Penguin Press.Her latest book, Leaving Before the Rains Come, was published in January 2015 Penguin Press.Fuller has also written extensively for magazines and newspapers including the New Yorker Magazine, National Geographic Magazine, Vogue and Granta Magazine Her reviews have appeared in the New York Times Book Review The Financial Times and the Toronto Globe and Mail.Fuller was born in England in 1969 and moved to Africa with her family when she was two She married an American river guide in Zambia in 1993 They left Africa in 1994 and moved to Wyoming, where Fuller still resides She has three children.



    332 thoughts on “Quiet Until the Thaw: A Novel

    • 3+ starsWhat first drew me to this book was the beautiful title. I didn't know until I received an advanced copy of it that it was a name from a Swampy Cree poem. One of the characters Rick Overlooking Horse doesn't talk very much so he is compared to the woman in the poem. The names and their meanings and the reasons why people are named as they are is just one of the things that fascinated me in learning some of the culture of the Lakotas that is reflected in the story. I was hoping to love th [...]


    • 4★“Rick Overlooking Horse said this time of night was for old people and children, the keepers of the wisdom. People in the middle of their years were busier, often doing unwise things, he said. They needed their sleep.”So where do YOU fit into the scheme of things? Old or young and thoughtful? Or busy and unwise and tired? This is an unusual debut novel from a published author of non-fiction. Fuller, born in England and raised in southern Africa, has channelled her ‘inner Lakota’ to w [...]


    • As an enrolled member of the Tohono O'odham nation (the tribe that is called Pima and Maricopa in this book) and a former resident of one of the Eight Northern Pueblos, I went into this book prepared to be very critical. I'm extremely uncomfortable about the idea of a white woman writing about the experiences of Native people, especially when said white woman grew up in colonial Africa. I am against the idea that any white person should write from the point of view of a Native person. They will [...]


    • Alexandra Fuller's first novel, Quiet Until the Thaw, is many things at once in its style and substance, but what left a lingering impression is its way of easily introducing the reader to the culture, beliefs, and history of the Lakota Oglala, while also itself being a sort of fable, filled with smaller narratives all connected into a larger whole. It's written in short, staccato paragraphs and chapters, told from the perspective of a sort of Sioux chorus, dipping in and out of the specific nar [...]


    • Lakota Oglala Sioux Nation, South DakotaA provocative story of an ancient tribe, an honorable history, an uncertain future, and the people who carry their voices forward.Grandmother Mina Overlooking Horse raised the two cousins, Rick Overlooking Horse and You Choose Watson who were born within a few weeks of each other and were left with her to raise. She had to make sense about their choices to be born at the particular time in history to their particular parents. Their paths will turn out very [...]


    • I am definitely NOT enjoying this I hope to finish it soon. The sooner the better. The best thing about it is that it is very short.******************I was extremely disappointed with this book. I have absolutely adored all of the author's autobiographical works set in Africa. Her book The Legend of Colton H. Bryant is also biographical but is not autobiographical and does not reach up to the quality of those books where she speaks of her own family and close friends. There is no depth to the ch [...]


    • There are so many excellent Native American writers. Why bother read a book about Native Americans written by a white woman, who was raised as a white kid in Apartheid. She was raised in the oppressor class, you get that right? She was raised entitled, white, and during Apartheid. You would be hard pressed to find someone LESS qualified then Alexandra Fuller to write a book about Native Americans. Not just writing about them, but as if she is one. She wrote this book as if she has an inner under [...]


    • I didn't enjoy this one. I wanted to. The blip on the jacket sounded great, but it left me feeling glad it was over. It covered so many things and for being such a short book, I'm not sure that wholly worked.I appreciated the effort in detail, but much of that was a bunch of broad sweeping strokes that lacked the detail I enjoy, especially when it comes to emotion. The Indian detail was clear and present, but I guess I was wanting understanding. I crave that kind of connection and I must have mi [...]


    • "Life is a circle and we as common people are created to stand within it and not on it. I am not just of the past but I am the past. I am here. I am now and I will be for tomorrow." Oglala Lakota maximAlexandra Fuller spent most of her life in Africa. In her letter which opens the galley of her debut novel Quiet Until the Thaw she writes that in encountering the Lakota Oglala Sioux she found an "unexpected homecoming, if home is where your soul can settle in recognition." The Native Americans we [...]


    • I received this ARC from netgalley in exchange for a review. A quick read at 250+ pages, Rick Overlooking Horse and You Choose Watson are cousins whose personalities are defined by their choices and circumstances.The story is kind of disjointed. Throughout the book, I'm thinking the author is trying to say something but I'm unable to decipher what it is then I read the book description again and decided this must be it. As Fuller writes, "The belief that we can be done with our past is a myth. [...]


    • I'm seriously not sure what I read, but it was amusingly told by a rather self-aware narrator. Not much is actually amusing. It's a generational tale, one old lady reluctantly fosters her grandson Rick Overlooking Horse, and another child of uncertain provenance, You Choose Watson. Rick is stoic, upstanding and hardly says a word. You Choose is a whole lot more gregarious, and quick to temper. He's a draft dodger whereas Rick gets himself caught in a friendly napalm explosion and loses an eye. R [...]


    • I won this book in a Giveaway. I don't know for sure if I want to give this 4 stars or 3. A very interesting book about life on the "Rez", and the traditional teachings of the Lakota Tribe, but kind of a strong sense that the white man is the only one to blame. I am not Indian, but I have lived in eastern South Dakota my entire 64 years. This is a sad story, but I just want to point out that there are no winners, no matter what side you take. I remember a bit about the events that Ms. Fuller wr [...]


    • I received an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.The culture and oppression of the Lakota Oglala is well told in this story of two cousins, and the diverse directions their life choices takes them. I am not certain, though, that the author, a white woman, is fully qualified to basically speak for the Lakota Oglala, however much time she spent with them. Only my opinion.


    • This is a tough book to review because I can't tease the story away from the person who wrote it and what that means within a larger context. Fuller is a talented writer, in that her short chapters are like delicate pieces of art. However, the story as a whole is more complicated. No matter how beautifully told, this is still a story about a people of which Fuller does not pertain. She spent three months on the Pine Ridge Reservation for research and that seems like a woefully small amount of ti [...]


    • Alexandra Fuller’s exploration of contemporary Native American life follows the lives of cousins Rick Overlooking Horse and You Choose Watson as they each navigate their path through an often difficult and conflicted existence. Each chooses a different approach; one tries to live peacefully, the other chooses violence, and their lives become inextricably entwined. It’s not so much a conventional narrative as a series of vignettes, taking the reader deep into the reservation and examining iss [...]


    • Alexandra Fuller's Quiet Until the Thaw is a compelling novel that manages to be funny and sad, satiric and sincere, cleverd deadly serious about the history of the government's policies concerning Native Americans and the way those policies have played out.In a portion about the forced removal of children from their families to place them in Indian Boarding Schools (which were mostly shut down by 2007), Rick Overlooking Horse and You Choose Watson are caught running to escape the Bureau of Indi [...]


    • Alexandra Fuller is a marvelous writer and is definitely not afraid to share a point of view, even in fiction. This is a very thoughtful and interesting short novel which illustrates the plight of our Native Americans. I definitely recommend it.


    • openbooksociety/article/quQuiet Until the ThawAuthor: Alexandra FullerISBN13: 9780735223349Author website: alexandrafuller/Brought to you by OBS reviewer KaytSynopsis: From bestselling memoirist Alexandra Fuller, a debut novel.Lakota Oglala Sioux Nation, South Dakota. Two Native American cousins, Rick Overlooking Horse and You Choose Watson, though bound by blood and by land, find themselves at odds as they grapple with the implications of their shared heritage. When escalating anger towards the [...]


    • It is sad indeed when art becomes balkanized by a movement that misinterprets cultural appropriation.Cultural appropriation exists because white people have appropriated words and symbols from other cultures and adopted them as their own. Chippewa, from the word “Ojibwe”, is a good example. No thought whatsoever was given to the effect of not acknowledging this cultural theft. People whose words, symbols and spiritual meanings were taken without permission understandably feel offended, deval [...]


    • I'm torn on this one. If I could give it 2.5 stars I would.First the good: I think the author's writing style is excellent. It's the sort of book that sucks you in and you find you can't stop reading until the very end. Some of the scenes described were moving, so much so that I found I had to pause briefly reading just to take it all in and process it. Now for the bad: The stereotypes presented of native people in this book made me cringe repeatedly. Actually, I think every single one was there [...]


    • I had such a hard time with this book, not because of the narrative or style, but because of the author's background, which one one level shouldn't matter, but on another level - given the access to the opportunity to get your work published (and that's just the tip of the iceberg) matters a great deal. In terms of making creative work, cultural appropriation is a very hot topic these days, and I appreciate being able to have that conversation. It's made me start to examine my own work and look [...]


    • Quiet Until the Thaw is the debut novel by Alexandra Fuller, an author known for her memoirs. It tells the story of two Lakota Oglala Sioux cousins, Rick Overlooking Horse and You Chose Watson. Though linked from birth and their shared experience being raised by their grandmother, the two boys take a different path in life. You Chose is the wild one who does not settle down. On the other hand, Rick is the quiet, contemplative one who prefers solitude yet is unafraid on taking a stand when needed [...]


    • This is one of those books that I admired more than liked. I was interested to read the first novel from memoirist Alexandra Fuller, and the contemporary American Indian reservation setting was one that I hadn't encountered before and it intrigued me. The writing in the book, which tells the story of two sets of orphaned Lakota Oglala boys growing up generations apart on their South Dakota reservation, is incredibly spare and almost terse, with chapters that usually last only a page or two--perh [...]


    • I am not sure what to think. I liked the story for the most part. I liked the episodic nature although it's terribly sad in many parts. However, it is very difficult for someone to write about a culture that is not their own, and particularly in the case of groups that have been so poorly mistreated and misunderstood, it can be unwise to do so I think I would have liked this more if a. the writer had included an author's note that gave her background and experiences with the Sioux Oglala tribe a [...]


    • I grew up in South Dakota in the same time as the start of this book. In the 70s I worked with local activists - including members of the Ogalala tribe, some of whom still had family on the Pine Ridge Reservation. Back then, books like Bury My Heart At Wounded Knee and Custer Died For Your Sins woke a whole generation up to the human cost of 'wining the West'. What I haven't seen -- until now -- is a book that evokes what one experiences just transiting the reservation on your way elsewhere. It [...]


    • I read this book for a book club I'm in, where I am not the designated book chooser. And while I don't regret reading it, I would never recommend it. The most interesting part of the book is its structure. It is told in very short chapters - sometimes less than a page. The sparse language is precise and the tone is consistent, which isn't high praise. The author can clearly write, but it's never clear why this is the story she's chosen to tell. While the characters are given depth, they aren't g [...]


    • I was unsure what to make of this book. I found the structure intriguing - each chapter a short vignette, so to speak, but each well connected to what came before and after. I appreciated the terse, straightforward prose, too. The finest aspect of the writing is the resigned comic relief that pervades the action, at the heart of which is the plight of oppressed Lakota Native Americans and the tragedies which befall the main characters. But it's one of those, "if we weren't laughing, we'd be cryi [...]


    • It's been years since my last GR giveaway win so I was pleasantly surprised to see I'd be receiving a free advanced copy of this book. Turns out this was just what I needed to pull myself out of a reading slump. This is Fuller's first novel. I haven't read any of her previous works of nonfiction so not sure how this compares. Part of what I loved so much about reading this book was it's short chapters. Most were only a page or so long. There were ample places to pause if need be, but more often [...]


    • I received this book as a Giveaway. In reading the book summary on the back cover, I think the concept of the story plot line was better than the execution. I found the 2-4 page chapters disruptive and lacking depth.Rick Overlooking Horse and his cousin, You Choose Watson, grow up on the Lakota Oglala Sioux Nation Rez in South Dakota. Returning from Vietnam as a wounded warrior, Rick Overlooking Horse chooses the ways of the land, the ancient practices of the Sioux, harmony and peace. You Choos [...]


    • I was so excited to read this book, particularly because I loved the story of Alexandra Fuller's African childhood in "Don't Lets Go to the Dogs Tonight." I was even willing to overlook the appropriation issue on the theory that telling Native American stories is more important than worrying about who is telling them. That being said, I found "Quiet Until the Thaw" a great disappointment. The people Fuller writes about in this book are not characters, but caricatures--flat, predictable, and with [...]


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