Political Tribes: Group Instinct and the Fate of Nations

Political Tribes Group Instinct and the Fate of Nations The bestselling author of Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother Yale Law School Professor Amy Chua offers a bold new prescription for reversing our foreign policy failures and overcoming our destructive po

  • Title: Political Tribes: Group Instinct and the Fate of Nations
  • Author: Amy Chua
  • ISBN: 9780399562853
  • Page: 267
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The bestselling author of Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother, Yale Law School Professor Amy Chua offers a bold new prescription for reversing our foreign policy failures and overcoming our destructive political tribalism at homeHumans are tribal We need to belong to groups In many parts of the world, the group identities that matter most the ones that people will kill andThe bestselling author of Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother, Yale Law School Professor Amy Chua offers a bold new prescription for reversing our foreign policy failures and overcoming our destructive political tribalism at homeHumans are tribal We need to belong to groups In many parts of the world, the group identities that matter most the ones that people will kill and die for are ethnic, religious, sectarian, or clan based But because America tends to see the world in terms of nation states engaged in great ideological battles Capitalism vs Communism, Democracy vs Authoritarianism, the Free World vs the Axis of Evil we are often spectacularly blind to the power of tribal politics Time and again this blindness has undermined American foreign policy.In the Vietnam War, viewing the conflict through Cold War blinders, we never saw that most of Vietnam s capitalists were members of the hated Chinese minority Every pro free market move we made helped turn the Vietnamese people against us In Iraq, we were stunningly dismissive of the hatred between that country s Sunnis and Shias If we want to get our foreign policy right so as to not be perpetually caught off guard and fighting unwinnable wars the United States has to come to grips with political tribalism abroad.Just as Washington s foreign policy establishment has been blind to the power of tribal politics outside the country, so too have American political elites been oblivious to the group identities that matter most to ordinary Americans and that are tearing the United States apart As the stunning rise of Donald Trump laid bare, identity politics have seized both the American left and right in an especially dangerous, racially inflected way In America today, every group feels threatened whites and blacks, Latinos and Asians, men and women, liberals and conservatives, and so on There is a pervasive sense of collective persecution and discrimination On the left, this has given rise to increasingly radical and exclusionary rhetoric of privilege and cultural appropriation On the right, it has fueled a disturbing rise in xenophobia and white nationalism.In characteristically persuasive style, Amy Chua argues that America must rediscover a national identity that transcends our political tribes Enough false slogans of unity, which are just another form of divisiveness It is time for a difficult unity that acknowledges the reality of group differences and fights the deep inequities that divide us.

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    About “Amy Chua

    • Amy Chua

      Amy L Chua born 1962 is the John M Duff, Jr Professor of Law at Yale Law School She joined the Yale faculty in 2001 after teaching at Duke Law School Prior to starting her teaching career, she was a corporate law associate at Cleary, Gottlieb, Steen Hamilton She specializes in the study of international business transactions, law and development, ethnic conflict, and globalization and the law As of January 2011, she is most noted for her parenting memoir, Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother.



    380 thoughts on “Political Tribes: Group Instinct and the Fate of Nations

    • Whether you lean left or right, this book will make you uncomfortable. And I believe it should. If it didn't, it would be a book appealing to one ideology over another and defeats the whole purpose of analyzing political tribalism and the appeal and danger that comes from both engaging in it and also by ignoring it. Chua first looks at what political tribalism is, the role it plays in other parts of the world, and how it is different than the dynamic in the United States. She then dissects US fo [...]


    • Amy Chua doesn’t mince her words. But she is very insightful and this is a good book that will make a significant contribution to the debate over the state of America and our collective future.For me, actually, it is really two books. In the first book she does a meticulous job of articulating and analyzing America’s many foreign policy blunders, starting with the Vietnam War. Her basic thesis is that American foreign policy has consistently ignored the perils of tribalism, and, specifically [...]


    • I gave this book only 3 stars for reasons explained belowbut the book is timely and is very important for a project I'm working on, and I do think most people should understand the concepts discussed here.But much of this book contains very little new perspective, other than to remind us that we are a tribal species. That we live in and support our tribes, even when we don't recognize them as such. This because very important to understand following the election of Trump.But where this book fall [...]


    • I have things to say about this book. The main thing is that EVERYONE NEEDS TO READ IT!After making strong cases that tribalism was an important factor in the Vietnam War, Afghanistan, and Iraq, Dr. Chua points to the US as a country divided "tribally" based on ideology and race. While this in and of itself may sound unremarkable, it is the way that Chua makes her case that makes this book a gem. She is empathic and insightful in her analyses of both the right and the left; consequently, there a [...]


    • Political Tribes: Group Instinct and the Fate of Nations by Amy Chua is an interesting and different look at group instinct and nations. Amy Chua explains the divisions that help decide the fate of nations and people by using group identity. It is a different type of group think. It is a way of looking how different groups(tribes) either work together or against and help or destroy nations. An insightful book and explained in an easy manner.I received a copy thru a Giveaway.


    • A quick read with thought provoking ideas. The book excels in describing how America's inability to grasp the influence of tribalism impacted its foreign policy snd mlitary interventions in Iraq, Afghanistan, Vietnam. The book begins to stumble when it turns its tribal lens on American politics and society today. Not because America isnt tribal, we are. we may have too many tribes to describe adequately in a 200 page book.


    • Chua sheds considerable light on a major shortcoming in Americans' worldview which has fostered an ineffective foreign policy and a lack of understanding of divisiveness within the country. She ends with some hope and suggestions (which are only a small beginning). A Langston Hughes poem concludes the book __ underlining the need to believe in America's promise although yet unfulfilled.


    • Moments of TruthA true call for moving away from either/or thinking towards accepting a truth that moves us towards healing and membership in the American “Supergroup’. Good reading for blues and reds alike.


    • I know Hillary Clinton wrote "What Happened," but Amy Chua explains conflict along tribal identity, inequality, and foreign policy with precision and clarity. She revisits the failures in Vietnam, Afghanistan, Iraq, and provides thoughtful context for today's rise in American nationalism. Riveting, persuasive, and remarkably readable; I couldn't put this down.


    • This book challenged me and fascinated me. I wanted to read every book or article Amy Chua cited. I wanted to read everything else she's written. I can't say I agreed with every single sentence or every single thought. But that's what I loved about her book - the challenge of it. I know that I learned from this book. And, ultimately, I was as inspired as Ms. Chua appeared to be, about the future. And a book that can make you feel hopeful is a rare commodity these days!


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